Category: moviesincolor

I talked about color in movies in The Plus this week. Check it…

I talked about color in movies in The Plus this week. Check it out! Thanks to the mag for featuring Movies In Color and getting my take on what makes films so great! ? ? ?

I talked about color in movies in The Plus this week. Check it…

I talked about color in movies in The Plus this week. Check it out! Thanks to the mag for featuring Movies In Color and getting my take on what makes films so great! 😄 📽 🎬

Monster IslandCreated, Written, and Directed by Harry Chaskin,…

Monster Island
Created, Written, and Directed by Harry Chaskin, Dan Lippert & Justin Michael

Godzilla vs. King Kong
Director: Ishirô Honda
Cinematography: Hajime Koizumi

Today on Movies In Color, I’d like to share a stop-motion short film made by extremely talented folks. Monster Island came out today and you can watch it here!

Take a trip to MONSTER ISLAND! Zog and Java are two best friends looking to throw the ultimate BBQ party. They also happen to be giant monsters imprisoned on an island. 99.9% stop-motion animation, 0.1% tiny live-action people!

The color in the short is stunning and shows a clear attention to detail as well as clear inspiration from films like Godzilla vs. King Kong. I made a few palettes to showcase their fantastic use of color and the clear parallel between the short and Toho monster films above.

Here is a bit of insight into the use of color in Monster Island from creator/writer/director Justin Michael.

“When we started pre-production on Monster Island, we always knew that color was going to be an important component for the piece to succeed. Harry and I are both enormous fans of old-school Toho monster movies, not to mention stuff of the Ray Harryhausen stop-motion variety. I grew up watching many of Godzilla’s decidedly goofier outings, and my absolute favorites were some of the more technicolor-looking iterations like Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla and Terror of Mechagodzilla, not to mention the wonderful and goofy King Kong Escapes!

We ended up pushing things a little further than those Toho films and really saturated the hell out of things, both in paint and fur choices during construction and fabrication, and in the post-production color sessions with our colorist Loren White. We wanted the island to feel vibrant and inviting, like a 1960s James Bond villain’s lair.”

Go watch this short! It’s great! 

Monster IslandCreated, Written, and Directed by Harry Chaskin,…

Monster Island
Created, Written, and Directed by Harry Chaskin, Dan Lippert & Justin Michael

Godzilla vs. King Kong
Director: Ishirô Honda
Cinematography: Hajime Koizumi

Today on Movies In Color, I’d like to share a stop-motion short film made by extremely talented folks. Monster Island came out today and you can watch it here!

Take a trip to MONSTER ISLAND! Zog and Java are two best friends looking to throw the ultimate BBQ party. They also happen to be giant monsters imprisoned on an island. 99.9% stop-motion animation, 0.1% tiny live-action people!

The color in the short is stunning and shows a clear attention to detail as well as clear inspiration from films like Godzilla vs. King Kong. I made a few palettes to showcase their fantastic use of color and the clear parallel between the short and Toho monster films above.

Here is a bit of insight into the use of color in Monster Island from creator/writer/director Justin Michael.

“When we started pre-production on Monster Island, we always knew that color was going to be an important component for the piece to succeed. Harry and I are both enormous fans of old-school Toho monster movies, not to mention stuff of the Ray Harryhausen stop-motion variety. I grew up watching many of Godzilla’s decidedly goofier outings, and my absolute favorites were some of the more technicolor-looking iterations like Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla and Terror of Mechagodzilla, not to mention the wonderful and goofy King Kong Escapes!

We ended up pushing things a little further than those Toho films and really saturated the hell out of things, both in paint and fur choices during construction and fabrication, and in the post-production color sessions with our colorist Loren White. We wanted the island to feel vibrant and inviting, like a 1960s James Bond villain’s lair.”

Go watch this short! It’s great! 

I got to make some color palettes for the best animation studio…

I got to make some color palettes for the best animation studio around, Studio Ghibli, to promote their newest and, sadly, last film When Marnie Was There. They’ve done Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away and many other amazing films and are masters at using color.

I am very stoked that the kind people at LOVE featured the palettes as a brief retrospective. Check out their post and read a bit about each palette below.

When Marnie Was There
Natural settings are highlighted in both palettes for when Marnie Was There. Each still’s location is vibrantly represented. From the yellows and bright greens in the forest to the bright blues and turquoises of the seascape, there is a clear intention to let the environment take center stage.

Ponyo
One of the more boldly colorful and childlike films, Ponyo masterfully combines a multitude of bright colors fitting for its universe. There is also an inherent softness to the colors that helps them all blend together, despite their boldness.

Laputa Castle in the Sky
The palette for this still from Castle in the Sky shows a versatile way to paint a night scene. The purple and blue hues are inviting but suggest depth, action and contrast nicely with the characters’ faces. The overall palette communicates night-time without overusing dark colors and blends purple hues effortlessly.

Princess Mononoke
Based on primary colors, this still from Princess Mononoke feels bold and eye-catching. By putting the character of San front and center and setting a mood with the fiery bold background, this still effectively communicates emotion through its palette.

Spirited Away
Spirited Away carefully combines dark and light hues and a contrast of colors to tell its story. The interior of the train feels cold and foreboding and uses darker tones of bright colors (reds, purples) to give the audience a sense of the unusual. The outside is vibrant and clear, using blue to create a peaceful and bright atmosphere.

Only Yesterday
This still from Only Yesterday captures a mood through its use of color. The peaceful and beautiful setting is achieved by combining mostly blues, greens, and yellows in both the field and the sky, unifying the frame and reflecting a sense of peace.

I got to make some color palettes for the best animation studio…

I got to make some color palettes for the best animation studio around, Studio Ghibli, to promote their newest and, sadly, last film When Marnie Was There. They’ve done Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away and many other amazing films and are masters at using color.

I am very stoked that the kind people at LOVE featured the palettes as a brief retrospective. Check out their post and read a bit about each palette below.

When Marnie Was There
Natural settings are highlighted in both palettes for when Marnie Was There. Each still’s location is vibrantly represented. From the yellows and bright greens in the forest to the bright blues and turquoises of the seascape, there is a clear intention to let the environment take center stage.

Ponyo
One of the more boldly colorful and childlike films, Ponyo masterfully combines a multitude of bright colors fitting for its universe. There is also an inherent softness to the colors that helps them all blend together, despite their boldness.

Laputa Castle in the Sky
The palette for this still from Castle in the Sky shows a versatile way to paint a night scene. The purple and blue hues are inviting but suggest depth, action and contrast nicely with the characters’ faces. The overall palette communicates night-time without overusing dark colors and blends purple hues effortlessly.

Princess Mononoke
Based on primary colors, this still from Princess Mononoke feels bold and eye-catching. By putting the character of San front and center and setting a mood with the fiery bold background, this still effectively communicates emotion through its palette.

Spirited Away
Spirited Away carefully combines dark and light hues and a contrast of colors to tell its story. The interior of the train feels cold and foreboding and uses darker tones of bright colors (reds, purples) to give the audience a sense of the unusual. The outside is vibrant and clear, using blue to create a peaceful and bright atmosphere.

Only Yesterday
This still from Only Yesterday captures a mood through its use of color. The peaceful and beautiful setting is achieved by combining mostly blues, greens, and yellows in both the field and the sky, unifying the frame and reflecting a sense of peace.

Batman: The Animated Series: On Leather WingsHere’s a still and…

Batman: The Animated Series: On Leather Wings

Here’s a still and palette from Batman: The Animated Series in honor of being on Batman: The Animated Podcast today. I was thrilled to talk to podcast host (and friend) Justin Michael about color use in the episode “On Leather Wings” (featuring Man-Bat). 

Check it out on iTunes and subscribe if you’re a Batman nerd. There are already a slew of fun and interesting guests and and I’m pumped to be sharing the episode with Andrea Romano the casting director responsible for some of my (and perhaps your) favorite cartoons including this one.

Enjoy!

Batman: The Animated Series: On Leather WingsHere’s a still and…

Batman: The Animated Series: On Leather Wings

Here’s a still and palette from Batman: The Animated Series in honor of being on Batman: The Animated Podcast today. I was thrilled to talk to podcast host (and friend) Justin Michael about color use in the episode “On Leather Wings” (featuring Man-Bat). 

Check it out on iTunes and subscribe if you’re a Batman nerd. There are already a slew of fun and interesting guests and and I’m pumped to be sharing the episode with Andrea Romano the casting director responsible for some of my (and perhaps your) favorite cartoons including this one.

Enjoy!

BCBGeneration was kind enough to let me wear their gorgeous…

BCBGeneration was kind enough to let me wear their gorgeous clothes and call me “cool”! In their feature, I talk about my band Hi Ho Silver OhMovies In Color, and about always doing things that interest you without fear of failure. Also, I share an embarrassing moment.

Hoooray! Excited to be a #gengirl!

BCBGeneration was kind enough to let me wear their gorgeous…

BCBGeneration was kind enough to let me wear their gorgeous clothes and call me “cool”! In their feature, I talk about my band Hi Ho Silver OhMovies In Color, and about always doing things that interest you without fear of failure. Also, I share an embarrassing moment.

Hoooray! Excited to be a #gengirl!